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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and chief justice holmes -- not holmes -- chief justice hughes said it was in the public interest. one of the themes he kept coming back to is the way in which individual rights had to be maintained. but that had to be within the context of a protection of the public interest more generally. >> do you have anything you'd like to add? >> i think those are great opinions to highlight. i think the great thing is, he was the chief justice for a number of years. he certainly wrote more than his fair share of the opinions. so they're definitely opinions we could point to. most obviously the west coast hotel and the laughlin steel cases are the ones that are essentially the pivot points for the switch in time. so those are certainly very important opinions. but i also think that there are some, what i would describe more as civil liberties opinions that he wrote, near against minnesota, a very important case that is really one of the very first important first amendment cases as part of the courts. now it's hard to imagine the supreme court of the united states without the first amendment. it
'arai. in 1847 harriet hunt wrote to dr. oliver wendall holmes to ask for permission to attend medical lectures. although dr. holmes supported this, the harvard corporation denied the request. in 1850, hunt applied again. she, too, was stubborn. this time the male medical students protested her admission along with that of three male african-americans. during world war i, a shortage -- there was a shortage of physicians, and a man emerged for women to study medicine at radcliffe, but it was not realized. a later plan allowed women to study at the harvard medical school for a radcliffe phd in medical sciences. the first real admission came in 1945 granting its first mds in 1949. the medical school was distinctive in one regard. in 1919 it appointed dr. alice hamilton to a professorial position in industrial medicine. she later taught at the school of public health. at the harvard law school petitions by women to enter began as early as 1871 and continued. their numbers included inez mulholland, vasser graduate and suffer gist. in 1915, 15 women petitioned and were denied. in a letter to harvard
saw entry. harriet hunt wrote to dr. holmes to ask permission to attend medical lectures, he supported this but the harvard corporation denied the request. in 1850, hunt applied again, she too was stubborn. this time, the male medical students protested her admission, along with that of three male african americans. during world war oi, there was shortage of physicians and a plan emerged for women to study medicine at radcliffe, but it was not realized. a later plan allowed women to study at the harvard school for radcliffe ph.d. in medical sciences. the first admission came in 1945, granting the first mds in 1949. the medical school was distinctidi distinctive in one record, it appointed a professor position. at the harvard law school, petitions by women to enter began as early as 1871 and continued. their numbers included inez, a graduate. in 1915, 15 women petitioned and were denied. in a letter to harvard president litman, he said harvard is one of the few institutions for men alone and in our opinion had better remain so. the law school was successful. but the admission of women m
a student here in boston, oliver wendell holmes wrote a poem about constitution and starts "old ironsides," long has it waived on high and many and i has danced to see that banner in the sky. it goes on to tell the story of constitution saying this wonderfulship shouldn't be scrapped and at least give it a proper burial at sea. we produced newspapers up and down the country so there was a rallying for constitution. people said she must be saved and the navy, in fact, did allocate the funds to save constitution. you can see this image of constitution as the poem described her that if she were to be scrapped instead of scrapping her, said set every thread bear sail and give her to the god of storm, the lightning and the gale. throughout the 1800s constitution served actively in the united states navy. you would have expected this ship to have lasted 15 to 20 years. so launched in 1797. she had her victories during the war of 1812, but she continued in service. the only image of her under sail was 1881. this is off the capes of virginia and she is serving as a training vessel and they would
in boston, oliver wendell holmes wrote a poem about "constitution." it's called "old ironsides." it starts out i tear her tattered ensign down, long has it waved on high. it goes on to tell the story of "constitution" saying this wonderful ship shouldn't be scrapped. if you're going to get rid of it at least give it a proper burial at sea. that was not to be the story. the poem was reproduced in newspapers up and down the country. so there was a rallying for "constitution." people said she must be saved and the navy, in fact, did allocate the funds to save "constitution." you can see this image of "constitution" as the poem described her that if she were to be scrapped instead of scrapping her, the poem says set every threadbare sail and give her to the god of storms, the lightning and the gale. throughout the 1800s "constitution" continued to serve actively in the united states navy. you would have expected this ship to have lasted 15 to 20 years. so launched in 1797. she had her victories during the war of 1812, but she continued in service. the oldest known image of her under sail is he
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)